Wednesday, February 6, 2013

So, is Blonde-Washing a thing now? Also, this just in.. Slut-shaming still sucks.

So I may seem hypocritical here, considering my past stance regarding POC's portraying fictional characters that are traditionally portrayed white.  That stance being that I am generally pretty okay with it and think people should not freak out so much about it.  I still stand by that.

That being said, context matters.

So I, like many others, are less than impressed with the new cover for the box set release of Lucy Maude Montgomery's classics Anne of Green Gables, Anne of Avonlea, and Anne of the Island.

Here's an older edition:
Source - Amazon.ca
And here's the new cover:

Source
This is wrong.  Mainly because Anne Shirley is a redhead and her being a redhead is pretty integral to the plot of the books and how Anne is perceived by the other characters in the book, as well as how Anne sees herself.  So making her a blonde is  ridiculous, at best.  

The other point is that these books take place in late nineteenth century Prince Edward Island.  So the flannel shirt and long flowing hair is a pretty huge anachronism.  So no, I am not impressed by this ill-though-out attempt to modernize Anne for a new audience and I sincerely hope some art director somewhere is having a strip torn off for clearly not picking up the damn book before designing the cover.

The new cover was posted this morning to a local radio station's Facebook page.  As expected, people were not amused and many voiced their disapproval.  Many more, frustratingly, took to insulting and slut-shaming the model on the cover, call her a tart, a hooker and otherwise speculating on this girl's sex life, because she is a blonde and posing in what can be considered a 'sultry' pose.  

People, this is a model.  I have not yet been able to find her name, but I would be willing to bet that when this cover was taken, she may not have even been privy to what they would be used for.  Perhaps just told something vague like "Oh, it's a cover for a book about a girl in the country" if that much information was even divulged.  Yet people feel entitled to judge this girl as though she personally went and defecated on Montgomery's grave.


 




That second last one makes me laugh out loud.  In what universe does a flannel shirt, buttoned up to the neck, qualify as "provocative" or "scantily clad"?  Oh, and butt-less chaps?  Where the hell did THAT come from??

It's pretty disgusting that people, out of a sense of indignation over a fictional character, feel entitled to insult and degrade the portrayer of said character with gendered slurs.  Anne Shirley is a fictional character, but that girl on the cover is an actual person*

*Unless, of course, she's the result of some really impressive photorealist-type illustration.

6 comments:

  1. The MINUTE I saw this, this morning, I thought of writing a post about it. Then I realized that you would be doing so, so I'm not going to bother.

    You have not only hit the nail on the head, you drove the ball home in your second last paragraph. When I read "scantily clad" I thought the exact same thing. EXACTLY!

    This is why you're my best friend.

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  2. As a redhead who loved these books growing up, EFF THAT! (And not sure what calling the model "slutty" accomplishes.)

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    Replies
    1. All it really accomplishes, in my opinion, is giving people an unfounded sense of self-righteousness.

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  3. In what world is that woman scantily clad? I'm wearing less right now, and I'm in my work uniform!

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    Replies
    1. The radio station this was on, afterwards posted a picture of Neil Young in a flannel and joked about how he must also be a scantily clad tart as well.

      Delete

Engaging in discussion and/or general sucking up.. that's where it's at!

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